Normal dietary fat contains mostly long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are more ketogenic than LCTs because they generate more ketones per unit of energy when metabolised. Their use allows for a diet with a lower proportion of fat and a greater proportion of protein and carbohydrate,[18] leading to more food choices and larger portion sizes.[4] The original MCT diet developed by Peter Huttenlocher in the 1970s derived 60% of its calories from MCT oil.[15] Consuming that quantity of MCT oil caused abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting in some children. A figure of 45% is regarded as a balance between achieving good ketosis and minimising gastrointestinal complaints. The classical and modified MCT ketogenic diets are equally effective and differences in tolerability are not statistically significant.[9] The MCT diet is less popular in the United States; MCT oil is more expensive than other dietary fats and is not covered by insurance companies.[18]
The Johns Hopkins Hospital protocol for initiating the ketogenic diet has been widely adopted.[43] It involves a consultation with the patient and their caregivers and, later, a short hospital admission.[19] Because of the risk of complications during ketogenic diet initiation, most centres begin the diet under close medical supervision in the hospital.[9]
The Metabolic Cooking is a fantastic, well organised meal plan that comes with more than 250 quick & easy fat torching recipes, structured guidelines, grocery lists, food logs and additional tips and tricks to drop off that stubborn fat and get into the best shape of your life. If you want better tasting recipes for your diet, made with spices and ingredients that will boost your metabolism and torch the fat, I really recommend grabbing a copy of “The Metabolic Cooking” created by my Canadian friends Dave Ruel and Karine Losier! Metabolic Cooking recipes have all been designed with high Metabolic Thermo Charge ingredients to boost your metabolism and burn more calories everyday.
Very happy to have stumbled across your blog site (during a recipe search)  only to realise that I have recently purchased 2 of your books (I'm in Australia). Both of which I like.  I have been doing this way of eating since February, switched from WW which was progressing slowly and I was often hungry. I am never hungry on this plan and I am finding it so much easier. And I am losing weight twice as fast. After about 2 1/2 months doing Keto I realised that the lists I was using for a resource for net carbs in foods was completely wrong. It said mushrooms was 0.3 net carb per 100g and I was happily having 200g thinking it was 0.6g and it wasn't. I ended up checking some lists against the USA Agriculture list and found all were wrong.  So I started to make my own list using that website. This was a bit of a pain but at least I knew it was accurate. Anyway,  I found your site and could stop doing my list. YAY!  🙏 Thank you so much for providing accurate information that you have referenced and for all the other guides and recipes you have shared.  I really wish these guides were in my books though (I have your latest book), so can you please consider for the next book 😁. I had to print them after saving it to MS word for a friend (that has also bought a book)  and it's pages of poorly edited A4 paper.  Many thanks again 🙏

What we know today as keto was developed as a clinical tool more than 100 years ago. In 1911, doctors noticed that children with epilepsy stopped having seizures after two days of absolute fasting, the point when their bodies would have been forced into ketosis. Scientists later noted that ketosis could be achieved through a low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) diet without the risk of infection and mortality rates associated with absolute fasting. Today, children resistant to anti-epilepsy drugs still follow ketogenic diets to prevent seizures, under the management of specialist dietitians.


What we know today as keto was developed as a clinical tool more than 100 years ago. In 1911, doctors noticed that children with epilepsy stopped having seizures after two days of absolute fasting, the point when their bodies would have been forced into ketosis. Scientists later noted that ketosis could be achieved through a low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) diet without the risk of infection and mortality rates associated with absolute fasting. Today, children resistant to anti-epilepsy drugs still follow ketogenic diets to prevent seizures, under the management of specialist dietitians.
Legumes (beans, chickpeas, lentil, peanuts, etc). Apart from peanuts, legumes are relatively high in carbs and should be avoided. Apart from their high carb content, legumes contain lectins and phytates which makes them hard to digest. They have been linked to leaky gut syndrome, PCOS, IBS and Hashimoto's. When it comes to peanuts, some people avoid them while others use them in moderation. If you are considering peanuts, make sure you read this post first: Peanuts on a Ketogenic Diet: Eat or Avoid?
I know you’ve been hearing and seeing the keto diet advertised everywhere. Maybe you’re already on the keto diet, but maybe you’re not and have no idea what all the buzz is about. Maybe you’re just doing a low carb diet and that’s working for you. Wherever you are in your health and journey, the keto diet is hot right now and getting a lot of attention and for good reason.

"Drastically limiting your intake of glucose, the usual energy source for your cells, reduces insulin secretions in your body. Since low levels of glucose are coming in, the body uses what is stored in the liver and then the muscles," says Rania Batayneh, MPH, the author of The One One One Diet: The Simple 1:1:1 Formula for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss. After about three or four days, all of the stored glucose is used up.
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